ACTIVITIES AND SIGHTS TO SEE YEAR-ROUND

There is little that can beat the feeling and view from a height of 
1,883 metres (6,178 ft). You only need to ask the many skiing enthusiasts and hikers who visit Gaustatoppen.

Gaustatoppen is famous for the winter sports opportunities it offers, the hard-to-beat vertical drop and the steep gradients of the off-piste skiing areas. But the experiences don’t stop with the end of the ski season or the mountain’s sheer drops.

Today, Gaustatoppen is the seventh largest ski resort in Norway, and the mountain is ready and waiting to inspire and captivate even more visitors. Measures taken to ensure this include the extension of the lift and piste system, as well as creating a new centre for the mountain. This is where we are building Gausta View.

GAUSTA VIEW BUILT HALFWAY UP THE MOUNTAIN

Gausta View is located in one of Gaustatoppen’s best ski-in/ski-out locations, with direct access to both the lift system and the cross-country tracks. Here, you will find yourself quite literally at the heart of the slopes, with plenty of descents and a new children’s slope just outside the door. Just a few pole strokes away is one of the mountain’s 13 lifts.

Just as close by are the restaurants, après-ski venues and equipment hire facilities, as Gausta View forms part of the new ski centre on the mountain.

EXTRAORDINARY SKIING

Gausatoppen offers plenty of variety in terms of pistes, tracks and difficulty level. Here, you can find a slope or cross-country track to suit you, regardless of whether you’re a beginner or seasoned pro.

If you’re looking for an adrenaline rush with more challenging courses, you’ve come to the right place. The vertical drop of the slopes is an impressive 1,650 metres, and off-piste you can find gradients of up to 40 degrees.

If you prefer cross-country skiing, there are plenty of tracks to choose between, with the longest measuring 23 kilometres (14 miles). The shortest is 3 kilometres (1.9 miles) and is lit in the evenings.

Quick facts
  • Kilometres of pistes: 45
  • Slopes: 35
  • Longest slope: 3,800 metres
  • Pistes equipped with electric lighting: 4
  • Lifts: 13
  • Children’s slopes: 3
  • Black runs: 5
  • Red runs: 11
  • Blue runs: 2
  • Green runs: 16
  • Evening skiing runs: 3
  • Cross-country skiing trails: 85 km

1,883 OTHER REASONS TO HEAD FOR THE TOP

Gaustatoppen is just as challenging and relaxing outside its long snow season. In the spring and summer, the mountain’s hiking routes attract plenty of people who want to experience the mountain’s magnificent views. The greatest experience is to be found on the summit, where at 1,883 metres above sea level on a clear day you can see huge swathes of Norway. The summit is also accessible via the Gaustabanen railway, running for just under 2 kilometres (1.2 miles) inside the mountain. Originally constructed for military purposes, it is still an adventure in its own right today.

MORE CHALLENGES IN TELEMARK, RJUKA AND HARDANGERVIDDA

Your experiences won’t stop with the opportunities available on the mountain. Thanks to Gaustatoppen’s location in the midst of Telemark’s natural expanses, Gausta View is handily positioned for a range of other challenges and places of interest. Just 20 minutes away is the town of Rjukan, the gateway to the Hardangervidda mountain plateau. The famous plateau is Europe’s largest, spanning 8.6 million hectares, several glaciers, and Hardangervidda national park. Every year the area draws many hikers, climbers and mountain bikers, for whom the easiest way to start their adventure is via the Krossobanen cable car. The cable car was the first of its kind in northern Europe, and transports visitors from Rjukan up to just under 900 metres (2,953 ft) above sea level in five minutes.

WORLD HERITAGE PROTECTED INDUSTRIAL AND WAR HISTORY

Rjukan is a tourist destination in its own right due to its industrial history. Norsk Hydro’s fertiliser manufacturing operations in the early 20th century were an export success that paved the way for Norway’s transformation from a poor country into a welfare state. This success was possible thanks to the construction of what was, at the time, the largest water power plant in the world. The town is also known for its later manufacture of so-called heavy water, and the Norwegian resistance movement’s acts of sabotage, which stopped Nazi plans for the manufacture of nuclear weapons during World War II. Today, the former power station has been repurposed into an industrial museum, forming part of a UNESCO-protected industrial heritage site.